30 1 / 2014

"I wish I could just go tell all the young women I work with, all these fabulous women, ‘Believe in yourself and negotiate for yourself. Own your own success.’"

Sheryl Sandberg

21 1 / 2014

via Death And Taxes Mag

In 1927 Claude Friese-Greene shot some of the first-ever color film footage around London. He captured everyday life in the city with a technique innovated by his father, called Biocolour.

Though we usually think of French names like Lumiere and Melies when we think of early film pioneers, Friese-Greene’s technique captures London in striking detail, as if putting the whole city in a time capsule. The people, most now long since gone, pass before us like ghosts. What’s striking is, apart from the noticeably formal clothing and a few old cars, how familiar and unchanged everything seems. Trafalgar Square, which the film’s title card describes as “another monument to a hero of the past,” looks the same now, as does London Bridge and the London Tower.

Urban Peek notes British Film Institute used computer enhancement to reduce the flickering effect of the original Biocolour and bring us this striking rare film which transports us back through time. Watch below.

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13 4 / 2013

"There are many places which nobody can look upon without being consciously influenced by a sense of their history…In some places history has wrought like an earthquake, in others like an ant or mole; everywhere, permanently; so that if we but knew or cared, every swelling of the grass, every wavering line of hedge or path or road were an inscription…When we muse deeply upon the old road worn deep into the chalk, among burial mound and encampment; we feel rather than see."

Edward Thomas, British Writer + Poet, as quoted in The Atlantic, April 2013

14 3 / 2013

Be a Maker.

04 3 / 2013

"The Newsroom" is such a great show. Pushing forward the conversation around and the need to asses and criticizing our media.

hulu:

This is Sam Waterston, Alison Pill and Olivia Munn watching Sam Waterston, Alison Pill and Olivia Munn backstage at the Paley Center’s Newsroom panel last night.Munn was given a chance to take on the world a little, so she tackled the ills wrought by the celebrification of reporting. It was framed by a few in the media as a tiff with the moderator, Piers Morgan, which it wasn’t. It was a conversation.She’s right. Reporters shouldn’t strive to be celebrities. That’s not really the problem.Then Aaron Sorkin hopped in. He wondered why Piers’ bosses don’t allocate the same resources and entertainment value to the sequester as they do to stranded cruise ships.It’s the human element, Piers said. It’s people thinking about getting stuck on a smelly boat eating onion sandwiches, waiting to get rescued.Why can’t they be that gripping with the sequester, then? Why can’t they tell those same stories with the same oomph and gusto?But that requires your anchor to be a celebrity. Or want to be a celebrity, at least momentarily. So the problems run into each other head on.Then Sam Waterston jumped in, prescient, and talked with the calm of a man who’s seen it all before, knowing we’ll survive anyway. He talked about how Pulitzer was a known, biased shithead—just a rich, known, biased shithead. He said it’s been worse. And he’s right.Afterwards, in the green room, where they’re standing for this picture above, Emily Mortimer came over to him and patted him on the chest. “You were so wise out there,” she said.She’s right. He’s right. The news sucks. It looks like it’s getting better. We’ll survive, even if it doesn’t.

"The Newsroom" is such a great show. Pushing forward the conversation around and the need to asses and criticizing our media.

hulu:

This is Sam Waterston, Alison Pill and Olivia Munn watching Sam Waterston, Alison Pill and Olivia Munn backstage at the Paley Center’s Newsroom panel last night.

Munn was given a chance to take on the world a little, so she tackled the ills wrought by the celebrification of reporting. It was framed by a few in the media as a tiff with the moderator, Piers Morgan, which it wasn’t. It was a conversation.

She’s right. Reporters shouldn’t strive to be celebrities. That’s not really the problem.

Then Aaron Sorkin hopped in. He wondered why Piers’ bosses don’t allocate the same resources and entertainment value to the sequester as they do to stranded cruise ships.

It’s the human element, Piers said. It’s people thinking about getting stuck on a smelly boat eating onion sandwiches, waiting to get rescued.

Why can’t they be that gripping with the sequester, then? Why can’t they tell those same stories with the same oomph and gusto?

But that requires your anchor to be a celebrity. Or want to be a celebrity, at least momentarily. So the problems run into each other head on.

Then Sam Waterston jumped in, prescient, and talked with the calm of a man who’s seen it all before, knowing we’ll survive anyway. He talked about how Pulitzer was a known, biased shithead—just a rich, known, biased shithead. He said it’s been worse. And he’s right.

Afterwards, in the green room, where they’re standing for this picture above, Emily Mortimer came over to him and patted him on the chest. “You were so wise out there,” she said.

She’s right. He’s right. The news sucks. It looks like it’s getting better. We’ll survive, even if it doesn’t.

10 2 / 2013

"Generation Flux…it is a psychographic, not a demographic - you can be any age and be GenFlux. Their characteristics are clear: an embrace of adaptability and flexibility; an openness to learning from anywhere; decisiveness tempered by the knowledge that business life today can shift radically every threes months or so."

Fast Company, Secrets of the Flux Leader, Robert Safian

29 6 / 2012

"It takes less time to do a thing right than to explain why you did it wrong."

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, American poet